Feel the passion!

Rosso Model "The myth in Miniature" Ferrari cars have written the story of motor racing, at last they are reproduced in 1:18 scale. Little masterpieces, hand made in Italy by master modellers, are now imported to Australia exclusively by Motorabilia. They are hand cast in resin and have exquisite detail due to hand engraved and etched metal parts. They have a rich red colour with a deep luster  and they are made in very limited numbers. Ladies, if you are passionate about the men in your life these make the ideal gift.  Click here for the full Rosso story.

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Description Product Id Price
1:18 scale model Ferrari 330 S 1965 by Rosso Model of Italy

Limited Edition of 300

RM016

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Ford set out to design a car that could beat those 'fast little red cars'. With the Lola Mk 6 as base, the Ford GT40 made its debut at the 1964 24 Hours of Le Mans. Now fitted with a four litre engine, the 330 P proved both quicker and more reliable than the little tested Ford GT. With no Fords finishing, Ferrari scored an impressive 1-2-3. In the GT-class. No expense was spared on either side of the ocean and Ferrari wheeled out the new P2 which would face Ford's 7-litre GT40. Again reliability problems let Ford down, but Ferrari's prototypes didn't fare much better, with the only surviving P2 finishing in 7th position. Ferrari's face was saved by the NART entered 250 LM. $399AUD

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1:18 scale model Ferrari 250 TdF  by Rosso Model of Italy 

(Tour de France)

 n 1

Mille Miglia 1958

Limited Edition of 300

RM025

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Ferraris took the top three places at the 1957 Tour de France (TdF) and another Ferrari legend was born. Starting in Nice and ending five days and 3345 miles (5383 km) later in Paris, it tested both durability and versatility through several road rally, circuit and hill climb stages. The first TdFs were modeled after the 250 MM, changes included a smaller rear windscreen, the addition louvers on the C pillar for cockpit cooling and more pronounced rear fenders. 
While dominating the Tour de France, the 250 TdF went on to class victories at the Mille Migla and many other events. In its day this car was the racer of choice until replaced by the 250 GT SWB, its disc brake successor.
$399AUD

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1:18 scale model Ferrari 275P  by Rosso Model of Italy

24 hour of Le Mans winner 1964 Guichet- Vaccarella

Limited Edition of 100

 

RM039

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$499AUD

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1:18 scale model Ferrari 375 Plus by Rosso Model of Italy

"Guida centrale"

(Centre Control)

Limited Edition of 300

RM004

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1954  1000 Km Buenos Aires  winner

$299AUD

 

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1:18 scale model Ferrari 750 Monza - 1956 Gran Premio Porto n 9 - by Rosso Model of Italy 

Opening engine cover. 

Limited Edition of 100

With engine detail!

RM031

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Using the 4 cylinder engine from the Ferrari 500 F2 , the Ferrari 750 Monza was a success from day one with a debut victory at the Grand Premio Supercortemaggiore at Monza (on the short course) and a 1-2 victory at the Sebring 12 hour  in 1956  This Limited Edition is sold out

 

 

1:18 scale model Ferrari 500 TR 1956 by Rosso Model of Italy

Limited Edition of 300

RM009

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Still using the 4 cylinder engine from the Ferrari 500 F2 , the Ferrari 500 TR had redesigned cylinder heads that the mechanics painted red to distinguish them from the old cylinder heads. So the Testa Rossa (red Head) was born. The body borrowed heavily from the 500 Mondials The Ferrari 500 Testa Rossa made a victorious debut at the 1956 Supercortemaggiore at Monza. 

1:18 scale model Ferrari 250 GT SWB Breadvan - n 16  by Rosso Model of Italy

"Le Man" 1962 

Limited Edition of 300

RM027

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Scuderia SSS Republica di Venezia, Drogo 'Breadvan' Drivers Carlo Maria Abate, I and Colin Davis, GB

DNF after 30 laps in 4 hours due to Gearbox failure

1:18 scale model Ferrari 750 Monza - 1955  by Rosso Model of Italy

 Opening engine cover.

Limited Edition of 100

With engine detail!

RM030

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This Limited Edition is sold out Click on the picture for great photos!

Using the 4 cylinder engine from the Ferrari 500 F2 , the Ferrari 750 Monza was a success from day one with a debut victory at the Grand Premio Supercortemaggiore at Monza (on the short course) and a 1-2 victory at the Sebring 12 hour  in 1956 

1:18 scale model Ferrari 250P  by Rosso Model of Italy

24 hour of Le Mans winner 1963 Bandini -Scarfiotti

Limited Edition of 100

Click on the picture for great photos!

RM038

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This Limited Edition is sold out Endurance racing was dominated by Ferrari when John Cooper turned the racing world up side down with his mid-engined F1 racers in the late 1950s. Caught off guard in Formula 1 by Cooper, Enzo Ferrari made sure he kept the upper hand in sportscar racing with a number of V6 and V12 mid engined prototypes. First seen in action in 1961, the Dino 246 SP was Ferrari's first step into mid-engine sportcars. After two years of racing with smaller engined prototypes the first V12 engined car was launched, the 250 P. In the years to come the P-series would form the mainstay of Ferrari's sportscar program.
Enzo Ferrari was proven right, after his cars scored the final front-engined victory at Le Mans in 1962, the 250 P took the first ever mid-engined win a year later. 

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Ferrari 500 F2 Engine

Although Ferrari dominated the Formula 2 class in 1949 with their 2-litre V12 engine, Enzo Ferrari had his eye on HWM's four cylinder Alta engine. One of the biggest advantages of the 'four' was its superior fuel effency compared to the gas-guzzling V12. Ferrari's new chief engineer Aurelio Lampredi set out to design a four cylinder to replace the Gioacchino Colombo designed V12. When the sports governing body decided that the World Championship would be run under Formula 2 regulations, the development of the 'four' got top priority.

Lampredi jointly developed a 2 and 2.5 litre engine, both sharing many interchangeable parts. Completely constructed of light alloy, the engine featured a double camshaft head. The 2-litre engine made its debut in 1952 in the 500 F2. Alberto Ascari drove it to the World Championship, winning six of the seven championship races. He took another championship a year later. In good Ferrari tradition, the Grand Prix engine was also fitted in a sportscar chassis. After two experimental models built in 1953, the 2.5 litre 625 TF and 3 litre 735 S, two four cylinder 'production' sportscars were released in 1954.

First up was the 3 litre model, which debuted at the Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore at Monza and was aptly called 750 Monza. The Gonzales/Trintignant driven 750 Monza featured a Dino Ferrari designed body and took a debut victory. Late in 1953 a 2-litre prototype was first raced. Fitted in a 250 MM chassis, Alberto Ascari and Luigi Villoresi drove the four cylinder to a class victory. To commemorate Ferrari's back-to-back World Championships, the 2-litre production car was dubbed 500 Mondial.

Both cars were campaigned by the works team and customers. The successes of the four-cylinder single seaters could not be matched, but various class victories were scored. Career highlights for the 500 Mondial was a second place in 1954 Mille Miglia and a class victory in the 1956 12-Hours of Sebring race. After the successful Monza debut, the 750 and subsequent 860 Monza struggled to keep up with the competition. A 1-2 victory in the Sebring 12-Hours of 1956 was the Monza's career best.

To keep up with the dominating Maseratis, Ferrari's new chief engineer Vittorio Jano set out to design a new 2-litre racer, but still using the Lampredi four cylinder engine. Dubbed 500 TR, it made a victorious debut at the 1956 Supercortemaggiore. This was the last four cylinder sportscar produced by Ferrari. Its replacement was a V6 engine.

Ferrari 500 TR 1956

One of the visible new features of the new car were its engine's red cylinder heads, after it was named Testa Rossa or TR, Italian for red head. The 500 TR's body was a development of the Scaglietti design used for the second series of 500 Mondials. It made a victorious debut at the 1956 Monza Supercortemaggiore, where Peter Collins and Mike Hawthorn beat the Maseratis.

Development continued throughout the year, which culminated in a special 2.5 litre version for Le Mans. Fitted with a Touring body, these Le Mans cars are commonly referred to as 625 LM. Rule changes forced Ferrari to update the 500 TR to comply with the 'Appendix C' for sports cars. These required the cars to be fitted with a full-width windscreen, a passenger door and a fuel tank mounted outside of the cockpit. Dubbed 500 TRC, the new car was fitted with a slightly restyled body, which was considerably lower than its predecessor's.

Ferrari's final four cylinder sports racer was campaigned by privateers, with the factory campaigning the new 250 TR V12 engined racer. Although the four cylinder engine was abandoned after the 19 500 TRCs were constructed in 1957, the 'TR' continued to be used for Ferrari's highly successful sports racers. Testa Rossas would win at Le Mans four times and the name made a return in the 1980s, when it was used for a GT road car.

Ferrari 330S

Endurance racing was dominated by Ferrari when John Cooper turned the racing world up side down with his mid-engined F1 racers in the late 1950s. Caught off guard in Formula 1 by Cooper, Enzo Ferrari made sure he kept the upper hand in sportscar racing with a number of V6 and V12 mid engined prototypes.
First seen in action in 1961, the Dino 246 SP was Ferrari's first step into mid-engine sportcars. After two years of racing with smaller engined prototypes the first V12 engined car was launched, the 250 P. In the years to come the P-series would form the mainstay of Ferrari's sportscar program.
Enzo Ferrari was proven right, after his cars scored the final front-engined victory at Le Mans in 1962, the 250 P took the first ever mid-engined win a year later. On the track Ferrari's dominance was as big as ever both in the prototype and GT class, but across the Atlantic Ocean a scheme was designed to break the Scuderia's stronghold. At first Henry Ford tried to buy Ferrari, but when negotiations failed, Ford set out to design a car that could beat those 'fast little red cars' as he called them. With the Lola Mk 6 as base, the Ford GT made its debut at the 1964 24 Hours of Le Mans.
Now fitted with a four litre engine, the 330 P proved both quicker and more reliable than the little tested Ford GT. With no Fords finishing, Ferrari scored an impressive 1-2-3. In the GT-class Ford scored a first success by beating the GTOs with the AC Cobra Daytona Coupe. No expense was spared on either side of the ocean and Ferrari wheeled out the new P2 which would face Ford's 7-litre GT40. Again reliability problems let Ford down, but Ferrari's prototypes didn't fare much better, with the only surviving P2 finishing in 7th position. Ferrari's face was saved by the NART entered 250 LM.

Ferrari 259 Gt TdF

From 1954 through to 1959, Ferrari manufactured roughly one hundred purpose-built coupes for endurance sports car racing. While winning the Tour de France (TdF) and other important events, these cars proved their versatility and became the racer of choice amongst top drivers. After Ferraris took the top three places at the 1957 TdF, they became legend, and the race organizers lent their name to the victorious design.
Starting in Nice and ending five days and 3345 miles (5383 km) later in Paris, the Tour de France was a highlight event in its day. In a true rally fashion, it tested both durability and versatility through several road rally, circuit and hill climb stages. Since this test was so grueling, most competitors, sometimes up to 70 percent, didn't finish. In more recent times, a modern and less demanding version of the TdF has been hosted as the 'Tour Auto' through France.
The common link between all 250 GTs was their surefire three-liter engine designed by Gioacchino Colombo. This engine was the smaller of the two developed by Ferrari, and was needed due to new restrictions on engine size. After the serious 1955 LeMans incident, a three liter limit was imposed in an attempt to curb high speed accidents. Although, Ferrari's three liter engine was still good for 230 to 250 horsepower and kept up regularly with the prototype entrants.

The TdF used this engine in combination with a long wheel base (LWB) chassis until a shorter 2400mm unit replaced it in 1959. Each chassis received a hand-crafted body, and most were bodied by Scaglietti to match a Pinin Farina design. Zagato, a Milanese design house known for their lightweight construction, bodied some particularly potent examples and Camillo Luglio became an Italian Champion in his.
Progressive development, and hand crafted bodies meant that no two 250 GT Berlinettas were the same. Differences were incorporated into the body from year to year, with subtle details such as sliding or wind-up windows, cowled or covered or plain headlights and varied hood louvers distinguishing each car. The first TdFs were modeled after the 250 MM, both having the same general proportions and wrap-around rear windscreen. Later changes to body included a smaller rear windscreen, the addition louvers on the C pillar for cockpit cooling and more pronounced rear fenders. By 1959, a new front end included open headlights to comply with Italian law as well as provide more light at night.
While dominating the Tour de France, the 250 TdF went on to class victories at the Mille Migla and many other Italian events. In its day this car was the racer of choice until replaced by the 250 GT SWB, its disc brake successor.

Rosso models of Italy

Rosso Models are entirely hand made in Italy. They are made from resin, hand cast, painted to perfection with several coats of colour for a rich depth and clear coat for a liquid luster. The details is added by hand and the small parts are engraved and photo etched. The wheels are hand made from Aluminium and have rubber tyres. They are made in very limited numbers with limited editions of 100 – 300 items, depending on the model. They are made to order and each run is slightly different to the last, different colour wire for the spark plug leads, difirent treatment for the windows etc due to improvements in their technique or in response to customer requests. 

They have a unique character that is not available in mass produced models. They are not perfect and the artists have taken license with scale and form but what they have created, while not an exact replica is a work of art. They have a deep colour and clear lustre which give them a liquid form that is the perfect medium for Ferrari’s beautiful sculptures. This is where the Italian cars stand out from all others, it is the artistry and passion that is executed in their form that sets them apart from their German and American counter parts. The Germans with their utilitarian forms and the Americans with an approach which belongs in the brutalism school. So the artists and craftsman at Rosso Models have captured the essence of the Italian design movement and rendered the Ferrari forms in a unique way, minimalistic  but with exquisite detail. Authentic looking historic racing machines from the Grand Premio Supercortemaggiore at Monza, Le Mans 24 hour, the Targa Florio, Buenos Aires 1,000km and the Tour De France. Feel the Passion!